FIA Foundation pledges support for Cycling Cities campaign

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Expanding access to shared bicycles and other forms of #micromobility shifts trips away from cars.
Expanding access to shared bicycles and other forms of #micromobility shifts trips away from cars.
It improves public health and wellbeing–both for people who ride and for people in communities who benefit from cleaner air.
It improves public health and wellbeing–both for people who ride and for people in communities who benefit from cleaner air.

The Institute for Transportion and Development (ITDP) has launched its Cycling Cities campaign, of which the FIA Foundation is proud to be a founder member, on UN World Bicycle Day.

The Cycling Cities campaign calls for 25 million more people to be living near safe cycle lanes by 2025. This is ambitious but achievable goal will lift up and unify ambitious cycling efforts, like temporary bicycle lanes and car-free streets implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic, to ensure more people choose cycling for more trips. It aims to build a movement, bringing together many cities and organisations to amplify real-world successes and generate momentum over the coming years.

Safe cycling infrastructure enables more people to cycle for more trips. Cycling Cities can improve equity by increasing access for many who lack direct and safe connections to opportunities and services - cycling expands access to jobs, schools, and other destinations by up to 15 times compared to walking. More Cycling Cities means less demand for, and use of, private vehicles which reduces the negative impacts of driving including road injury and death, air pollution, noise pollution, low physical activity levels, and the physical division of communities. 

This is particularly important in a post-COVID world where cities have an opportunity to reshape their streets to meet new needs and behaviours;  cities that added temporary cycling infrastructure during the COVID-19 pandemic saw 48% more cycling trips than those cities that did not. The environmental impact of shifts to cycling is also vital - justl 5% more trips made by bicycles instead of by cars before 2030 globally, would reduce CO2 emissions by the equivalent of taking more than 134 million cars off the road. 

One of the FIA Foundation’s key demands in its Manifesto 2030, is a call for every city to set an ambitious target for protected cycle lanes as part of the effort to halve road deaths by the end of the decade, as set out by the Stockholm Declaration. This campaign will help to deliver that demand alongside policies like low-speed limits and designated resources to support cycling in the long-term.

Sheila Watson, Deputy Director of the FIA Foundation, said: "The case for Cycling Cities is urgent and vital for our own health as well as for the health of our planet. We must re-think what streets need to deliver for citizens in a post-pandemic landscape, and we must move to more equitably shared streetspace. The FIA Foundation is proud to pledge its support to the Cycling Cities campaign to support action to ensure everyone feels safe to cycle anywhere with dedicated, well-connect cycling infrastructure."